Winter Turning
Middle Grade / Juvenile / September 6, 2016

Wings of Fire #7. Author: Tui T. Sutherland. Summary: Winter has been a disappointment to his royal IceWing family his whole life. When his sister, Icicle, runs away from Jade Mountain Academy, fleeing terrible crimes and possibly planning to commit more, Winter knows that they both need a second chance to make things right — if only he can find her. Winter’s new clawmates, Moon, Qibli, and Kinkajou, won’t let him make this dangerous journey alone. They don’t seem to understand that IceWings, the most superior of all dragon tribes, can fix their own problems. When their search leads the dragonets straight into Queen Scarlet’s vicious talons, Winter is grateful to have some help. But even the bravest dragons can’t follow him to the Ice Kingdom, where he’ll have to face the greatest threat of all: his own family. My Thoughts: I had forgotten why I keep reading these middle grade books! While having a high level of violence possibly unsuitable for younger readers, they are never very graphic. The characters are interesting, with back-stories and dilemmas and character growth, the plot is fun, and the pace never slows down. An excellent action-adventure read, like the rest of the series….

Wintergirls
Young Adult / September 6, 2016

Author: Laurie Halse Anderson. Summary: “Dead girl walking”, the boys say in the halls. “Tell us your secret”, the girls whisper, one toilet to another. I am that girl. I am the space between my thighs, daylight shining through. I am the bones they want, wired on a porcelain frame. Lia and Cassie are best friends, wintergirls frozen in matchstick bodies, competitors in a deadly contest to see who can be the skinniest. But what comes after size zero and size double-zero? When Cassie succumbs to the demons within, Lia feels she is being haunted by her friend’s restless spirit. Laurie Halse Anderson explores Lia’s descent into the powerful vortex of anorexia, and her painful path toward recovery. (Published summary) My Thoughts: This was an odd read. I didn’t like it. Not really. It’s painful, and jarring, and even confusing. It’s supposed to be. Told in the first person, Wintergirls is one teenager’s story of fighting a life-threatening eating disorder, and perhaps mental illness. The world view she drags us into is unbalanced and spiraling downward. The story is well-written. I found it compelling, and Lia a sympathetic character, even when she admits to making the wrong choices. The writing…