Thud!
Adult / June 9, 2016

A Discworld Novel. Author: Terry Pratchett. Summary: Koom Valley? That was where the trolls ambushed the dwarfs, or the dwarfs ambushed the trolls. It was far away. It was a long time ago. But if he doesn’t solve the murder of just one dwarf, Commander Sam Vimes of Ankh-Morpork City Watch is going to see it fought again, right outside his office. With his beloved Watch crumbling around him and war-drums sounding, he must unravel every clue, outwit every assassin and brave any darkness to find the solution. And darkness is following him. Oh . . . and at six o’clock every day, without fail, with no excuses, he must go home to read ‘Where’s My Cow?’, with all the right farmyard noises, to his little boy. There are some things you have to do. (Goodreads summary.) My Thoughts: Although all the Diskworld novels are much alike in their light-hearted ingenuity, comedic tone, and occasional critiques, they still vary in my interest. Thud I liked much better than others. The secondary reason is probably because the comedy is much more serious – this book is not just laughing at the wild vagaries of this world, it’s laughing with tears in…

Elijah of Buxton
Middle Grade / Juvenile / June 9, 2016

Author: Christopher Paul Curtis. Summary: Eleven-year-old Elijah is the first child born into freedom in Buxton, Canada, a settlement of runaway slaves just over the border from Detroit. He’s best known for having made a memorable impression on Frederick Douglass, but that changes when a former slave steals money from Elijah’s friend, who has been saving to buy his family out of captivity in the South. Elijah embarks on a dangerous journey to America in pursuit of the thief and discovers firsthand the unimaginable horrors of the life his parents fled–a life from which he’ll always be free, if he can find the courage to get back home. My Thoughts: This is an excellent historical fiction in the juvenile section, and I should think older readers will also find it interesting. The child’s voice is consistent and believable, and because of the setting in a freed-men’s town, it manages to portray some of the treatment and horror of slaves without overwhelming the younger audience it is aimed at. Content Review: Sexual content: School-children misread a board that reads “familiarity breeds contempt” as saying “family breeding contest” which leads to some interesting speculation. Language: 1 d***, 1 derogatory term Violence: Man…